West Blatchington


West Blatchington is often seen as subsumed in the shadow of its larger neighbour Hangleton. But while it does have a similar landscape (a Downland dip-slope parish lying north of Hove) West Blatchington has some more substantial and immediately noticeable buildings as its core. It is hard to miss a windmill! – especially when driving along the main traffic routes, Hangleton Road and Nevill Road.

History

Once a small village to the north of Hove, with a population of less than a hundred for many years, West Blatchington was developed as a large housing estate just before and after the Second World War, and all that now remains of the original village is the mill and church. The impressive windmill and granary is a grade II*-listed building but its age is rather uncertain; probably dating from around 1820, it certainly existed by 1823, and in 1825 was sketched by Constable. Milling ceased in 1897 and it has been open to the public since 1979.

Area

One of quiet suburban respectability. It grew rapidly in the inter-war period, but unlike Hangleton it had more infrastructure, with St Peters church, a working farm, a windmill and the proto-industrial area grouped around the Goldstone pumping station and its workers’ cottages. West Blatchington is often seen as subsumed in the shadow of its larger neighbour Hangleton. But while it does have a similar landscape (a Downland dip-slope parish lying north of Hove) West Blatchington has some more substantial and immediately noticeable buildings as its core. It is hard to miss a windmill! – especially when driving along the main traffic routes, Hangleton Road and Nevill Road.

 

John Hoole Estate Agents cannot be held responsible for the information contained herin, and it should not be relied upon, as it has been acquired from a variety of different sources. It is purely intended to be a guide with the very best intentions.